Production Project Session 5

Game Competition edition

SUMMARY

Role

Lead Artist

Intention (SMART Goal)

My May 10th, as part of team 2 session 5, I will create a boss theme for lust using “HOW TO CYBERPUNK 2077 MUSIC

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Thee guys who made the music for Cyberpunk 2077 giving an interview on how it went

Training Source(s)

2:00 90-110 bpm Snare and kick, with hi-hats after 8 bars

3:23 To make the guitar sound use a simple guitar pluck with an distortion effect applied

4:22 To make a bass line add some notes that sound dark and edgy

8:30 Sawtooth Synths with lots of reverb are good for leads and buildups

9:00 random bursts of sounds and voice snippets can be good

SMART Goal Schedule

  1. Implement the boss by April 15th.
  2. Have cutscenes finished by May 6th

PRODUCTION

SMART Goal Starting Point Evidence

Itch.io page

SMART Goal Ending Point Evidence

Slideshow

While this session I continued making sprites, I also started making music. My evidence is this slideshow is the soundtrack I made for the boss. I also worked on music for the title screen and main dungeon soundtrack

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

As always, I had to overcome issues this session, but now, these issues were music-related. It turns out, I probably should have watched more videos on how to put notes together, and how to pick instruments that sound good together and make melodies. Through trial and error, I found repeating notes is a strong tool for making good sounds and makes things easier since you don’t have to come up with more notes.

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

Perhaps what I had to communicate on the most, was the boss. For instance, Lust needed a melee move, but lust doesn’t have a weapon or claws. Lust does though have wings. Thus I made sure to tell the programmers that Lust’s melee attack would need two hit-boxes so that they would not be surprised.

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

I had to learn a lot of SoundTrap to make some songs. For the first song I made, I didn’t know how to make notes shorter. These notes then were very long, and couldn’t make a good song for the main game. I instead used it as the title screen. I then learned how to shorten these notes (zoom in), and proceeded to learn even more about SoundTrap.

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

This session was all about work, and I did a lot of it. I made a ton of sprites for the Lust, pumping out 2-3 sprites an hour. For some reason, I decided to give Lust some fancy gradients. Nevertheless, I made half of the lust sprites this session, while also making 3 whole songs for the game, as well as a title screen. I think I developed a good work ethic.

Reactions to the Final Version

Most of the feedback was to bugs, most of which don’t apply to me

  1. Multiple hit swords
  2. Funky dash
  3. Moving beam
  4. Beam under other things
  5. Too big hitboxes
  6. Max health above 12

All i have to do is remake the dash animation

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

I would say under the S.U.C.C.E.S.s model, I did succeed. My sprites were simple and to the point, and I tried to make my music at least a bit unexpected, where it had common tunes but not any “chorus” part. Still not very sure how concrete applies, other than that I tried my best to give Lust consistent colors and proportions (though some animations require distortion of the wings). Credible doesn’t apply, next is emotional. Now I’m not tearing up when looking at my sprites or listening to my music, but I do feel a bit of joy looking at or hearing them, so that’s good. Lastly is story. I think the best example I have for this is the song I made for the floor, the one you hear through most of the game. I specifically added leading notes and bass notes so that they respond to each other as if they were arguing. So if I did work that does the requirements that apply, I would certainly say I was successful.

Grammar and Spelling

Grammarly

Editor

Bryce Roberts

Production Project Session Four

SUMMARY

Role

Artistic Lead

Intention (SMART Goal)

By March 2nd, as the Lead artist of team 2, I will make attack animations by following Animations for an Action RPG Character – Pixel Art Breakdown and create 3 attacks for separate entities for our Session 4 project.

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Ari Gibson is one co-founder for Team Cherry which worked on Hollow Knight. Ari Gibson made lots of art.

Training Source(s)

Project Timeline

  1. Basic enemy AI
  2. Functional Imp sprites
  3. Improved room generation
  4. Basic boss implementation
  5. Basic player upgrades

Proposed Budget

Pre-Production edited by John Zickuhr

PRODUCTION

SMART Goal Starting Point Evidence

Itch.io

Skills Commentary

In this session, I focused on attack animations. The imp was the first thing I worked on this month, and I’m happy with this result, especially the emanata. I also redid the sword attacks to look better, made an animation for the player firing a beam, and several traps. I’ve also been working to make my animations longer so I can fully capture the world.

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

I had to create a couple of new things for this session. I needed to make several new assets. I think my arrow trap was creative. I made a sort of demon statue that shoots arrows from his mouth. There was a problem of how I did not know how to show a signal it was about to shoot when he was facing upwards. I solved this by giving the demon a tail that would move before he fires a shot.

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

I had to collaborate quite a bit with my team. I needed to know how other traps like the lava trap would work. If I didn’t ask Bryce how he wanted it, I would have made a completely different trap. The team leader, John, asked me to do a bit more work on the sword attack sprite, which I agreed with. I got part of it to look better, but I think I should return to it again.

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

I used media literacy to get inspiration for the traps. It’s a good thing I did because if I didn’t I would have made a worse spike trap. I also experimented a bit with layers on PixelArt, particularly to make a beating heart that will heal the player.

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

I developed life and career skills by just getting work done. Sometimes you just have to get on the grind and get some sprites out. You need something, you get an idea, you make it, spend some time revising it, ask others what they think, and you submit it.

Reactions to the Final Version

Jim Flatmo said our game was cool so yeah, I’m the best.

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

Looking at my work under the S.U.C.C.E.S.s model, I think I did well. I kept it simple but still good. I wouldn’t say my work was unexpected, but I think it will keep players engaged. My work is also pretty concrete, one could argue too much and they could move a bit more. I don’t know how credible my art is, but the developers like it so they’re my credit. My work brings lots of emotions, from the soft feeling of looking at something kind of cute to the betrayal when it attacks you. I can also make the players feel fear, some of the work is very spooky. Lastly, my work tells a story, the story of a guy fighting demons.

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

Generally, all my problems just come from me thinking my work could be better. I can solve this problem in various ways. I can look for inspiration, redraw it, find a tutorial. Other times I just look at it for a bit, trying to find what could be improved. It’s also important to ask others for their opinions on it.

Grammar and Spelling

Grammarly

Editor

Leo

Production Project Session 3

SUMMARY

Role

Character Artist

Intention (SMART Goal)

By January 28, as part of my game design team, I will have completed Flow Studio’s color theory guide to be able to indicate how items, enemies, traps, spells, and powers will impact the player for our session 3 project.

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Nick Wozniak

Training Source(s)

Project Timeline

Proposed Budget

PRODUCTION – ACTION

The (FILM, SOUND, or GAME Creation)

Game under production

Skills Commentary

Game under production

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

I had to think a lot while making sprites, as it is a very creative endeavor. I had to design original characters, consider the perspective of the character, solve problems such as how do you make it top down without a massive head, and make sure it looks nice.

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

I had to communicate with my team quite a bit, as when making a character you have to consider its hit boxes. We discussed things such as how we may want to limit some elements to be only 4 directional so I have less work, and then having some enemies only move diagonally just as a fun extra mechanic for those enemies.

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

I did all my work on pixelart.com, which is what I used the last session, so I haven’t learned much. While I would focus on trying to learn how to import my animations to Unity, I have to pump these babies out and John’s work is early development so I’m just going to let him do it.

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

I suppose the biggest skill I’m developing is sometimes, you just have to deal with the fact you don’t know how to make something perfect. I’m unhappy with the sword animation, but it does function and convey a swipe of the sword, and it would take a while to make it perfect. Therefore, it’s best just to leave it be and move on to the next thing.

Reactions to the Final Version

Game did not ship

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

Game did not ship

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

Well, I learned a lot about perspective and how to make it look not bad. I also learned a bit about color theory. I solved the problem that we need sprites, and I think I did a good job solving that problem.

Grammar and Spelling

Grammarly

Editor

The MDA Game Framework

CueNotes
What is MDA?
What does it stand for?
What do those mean in games?

MDA is an approach to understand games.
M- Mechanics D- Dynamics A- Aesthetics
Mechanics are the data and algorithms of the game
Dynamics- behavior of mechanics and player input
Aesthetics- emotional response of player
Games should be thought of as challenge, fantasy sensation, not just fun
For a competition game, you want the players to want to compete.
When dealing with dynamics, you want to consider the aesthetics and response of the player.

Summary

Production Project – Session Two

SUMMARY

Role: Artist

I was the lead artist, so I made most of the sprites and the music

Intention (SMART Goal)

Goal: Make an interesting setting for the game using sprites.

The specific skill needed for making these sprites is the ability to make cool pixel art. It’s measurable if somebody look at these sprites and say “yeah this game has a cool world”. This is also achievable, as while I still have a lot to learn about pixel art, I can create an interesting world. I’m setting this goal now because I think it’s important for the sprites you make to enhance the world of the game, so it’s best if I learn that now. The deadline for this goal is when the game releases, and I think I can make enough sprites by then.

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Below is gameplay of Jason Perry’s game Jubilee, courtesy of his Twitter

There’s also an Interview with Jason Perry by Concept Art Empire

Jason has made a couple of small indie games by himself and specializes in pixel art. He also has several asset packs for sale and free tutorials on his website, finalbossblues. I think he stands out because, just look at his art, that’s cool. I also think it’s a neat idea to sell your pixel art to small game designers so they can make a game without having to make the art themselves.

Training Source(s)

  • 1:15 Start with small canvases
  • 3:31 Make every pixel count
  • 3:55 Make a silhouette first
  • 4:15 Keep objects to 3 colors, each color also has a base, shadow, and highlight.
  • 4:40 To make a shadow, decrease value and saturation, while also making color a bit bluer
  • 4:55 To make highlights, do the opposite of what you do for the shadow to make a highlight for a regular object, but for shiny objects, you should still decrease saturation
  • 5:45 Helpful website for palettes is lospec
  • 5:55 For shading, keep in the top right or left corner, and keep it consistent
  • 6:10 There are three main types of borders, none, solid color, and the “complex one”
  • 6:55 Look at other people’s art for inspiration and learn from them

Project Timeline

  • Brainstorm ideas for the game
  • Decide which ideas we like and how easy they would be to implement
  • Program minimal viable product
  • Program additional features
  • Design levels using features
  • Design sprites
  • Program menu
  • Design song
  • Fix bugs
  • Present game

PRODUCTION – ACTION

The (FILM, SOUND, or GAME Creation)

Warp Wizard

Skills Commentary

Presentation

I think we did a good job. I particularly like my wizard walking animation so I included the sprite sheet. The song I composed is also really cool.

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

I was creative with my sprites by choosing that a platformer where you can redirect projectiles would be best represented as a wizard. I then innovated by thinking about another group’s game, lizards vs wizards. If they have a game about lizards fighting wizards, and our character is a wizard, then he should fight lizards! I also used critical thinking to analyze my sprites and improve them. Lastly, I used problem-solving to look at how my sprites looked in movement by making a short gif of what it would look like and deciding if I liked it.

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

I would often communicate with my team to see what sprites we needed, what the sprite would look like, and whether or not they liked the finished project. I often collaborated with Leo when he was making the backgrounds.

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

I used information literacy to figure out the tools my pixel art creator had and decided how to use them to improve my art. I made a lot of cool stuff using the brush tool.

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

During this project, I was developing the skill of getting work done, even outside of the work environment. I made a lot of sprites, and I even worked on a couple of them in the free time I had outside of class. I think that’s a very useful skill to have when we’re surrounded by distractions we could do instead.

Reactions to the Final Version

I asked a lot of online friends to play my game, and I’d like to use their comments. It seems they had a lot of problems redirecting the projectiles, but they liked my work on the art and music. Although one of them said “omg the music scared me” when they first started which was a sentiment shared by one of my teammates on an earlier version of the song.

Nate from class said “I really liked the re-direction mechanic”. While john

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

I think I did a good job, lets look at it compared to the SUCCESs model

  • Simple- Both my art and music were pretty simple, easy to understand, but still good
  • Unexpected- Well perhaps the lizard making an appearance and the scary bits of my song were unexpected, but overall I don’t think this applies much to art and music
  • Concrete- I don’t know how this applies to art, so I’m just going to say my work was solid
  • Emotional- Well one of my unused sprites was a very emotional picture of the wizard’s hat next to a blast mark and some blood, but that wasn’t used. Ooh! I did install the emotion of fear with my music
  • Stories- I think my art did tell a story, and that was essentially my SMART goal, which I think I knocked out of the park.

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

I learned a lot about making pixel art. It’s always been a hobby I would practice but never really like my works, but getting to work on my art for a project motivates me to make my art better and ask other people what they think of it. It’s changed my perspective on my art since it turned out a lot of people liked my art, which I thought looked terrible. I’ll go away from this not only trying to make my art even better but also looking for advice from professional artists to figure out techniques I can use to improve it.

Grammar and Spelling

Grammarly

Editor

John Zickuhr